iA


Russ Holthouse Posts

050. Lomo Featured Project: Taco House. Lomo Styles: Vernacular Pompidou.

Although its subject was both populist and endangered, our recent post on the topic of Noyes-pattern Mobil service stations veered into corporate High-Modernist territory through a blurry border-crossing where High and Low meet. Today’s featured project, Taco House at 215 West 8th Street, better reflects the standards of humility to which the Lower Modernisms project […] «Read more»

046. Lomo Featured Project: Erwin Street Commercial Center, Van Nuys.

The Erwin Street Commercial Center (ESCC) at 15500 Erwin Street, Van Nuys, Los Angeles, is a diagram building of unexpected rigor and quality. It resembles an architecture student’s design project – specifically, it looks like about three-quarters of my own studio projects, which had a tendency to expose their structural frames and adorn their exteriors […] «Read more»

040. Lomo Featured Project: Henry’s Tacos, Studio City. Endangered Lomo.

Standing at the corner of Tujunga Avenue and Moorpark Street in Studio City/North Hollywood since 1961, Henry’s Tacos is a taco stand in the literal sense of the term – you conduct your transaction standing at a window. The tacos are “gringo” style. The crunchy taco shells are fried prior to filling, like the ones […] «Read more»

034. Lomo Featured Project: Green Valley Circle Apartments, aka the “Monster Mansard.” Lomo Styles: The Gourmet Mansardic. Essay by Russ Holthouse.

Editor’s Note: Today’s essay is the second contribution to the Lower Modernisms project by Russ Holthouse – his first post was on the topic of Popular Modernism. Russ and I visited the GVCA together on October 30, 2011, and share credit for the photography. I consider the GVCA to be a tremendous find (and please […] «Read more»

022. Lomo Featured Project: Fosters Freeze. Lomo Styles: The Gourmet Mansardic. Lomo Building Types: Fast Food Restaurants.

American fast food restaurant chains hit their major growth spurt in the middle of the century and were a building type intrinsically suited to the Lower Modernist mode. A playful architectural style that was inexpensive, easily replicated and recognizable matched the needs of these restaurants trying to establish the familiarity of their brands and implant […] «Read more»

008. Lomo Manifesto Part 2: Russ Holthouse on Popular Modernism.

Editor’s Note: Today’s post, continuing the dialog about the significance of the Lower Modernisms and contextualizing them as a subset of Popular Modernism, was contributed by Russ Holthouse. Russ is a Los Angeles-based architect, a fellow enthusiast and student of Modernism, and an old friend of mine. -JAB I think what you’ve described as “The […] «Read more»